AOTA Web Site Notice

We will be performing our annual physical AOTA Store inventory beginning Wednesday, June 26th. During this process, we will be able to process orders but will be unable to ship products right away. We anticipate shipping to resume on or before Wednesday, July 3nd.Please note that orders for online products and ebooks are not affected and will continue to be fulfilled as usual. Thank you for your patience.

AJOT CE: Effectiveness of Environment-Based Interventions That Address Behavior, Perception, and Falls in People With Alzheimer’s Disease and Related Major Neurocognitive Disorders: A Systematic Review
Sorry! Image not available at this time

SKU: CEAJOT52

Publisher: AOTA Continuing Education

Published: 2017

Download
$20.99
Member Price
Non-Member Price: $24.99

Product Overview

Earn CE Credit With AJOT Articles!

Learn about tested treatment strategies by reading AJOT articles in your area of practice. Become an evidence-based practitioner and demonstrate your knowledge by passing the course exam.  Articles have been selected for their relevance to practice, fresh ideas, and strong evidence supporting treatment and the distinct value of OT.

 

Credit: .1 CEUs (1.25 NBCOT PDU’s/1 contact hour)

Authors

Lou Jensen, OTD, OTR/L, is Assistant Professor of Occupational Therapy, Creighton University, Omaha, NE; loujensen@creighton.edu

René Padilla, PhD, OT/L, FAOTA, LMHP, is Vice Provost for Global Engagement and Associate Professor of Occupational Therapy, Creighton University, Omaha, NE.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE. This systematic review evaluated the effectiveness of environment-based interventions that address behavior, perception, and falls in the home and other settings for people with Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and related major neurocognitive disorders (NCDs).

METHOD. Database searches were limited to outcomes studies published in English in peer-reviewed journals between January 2006 and April 2014.

RESULTS. A total of 1,854 articles were initially identified, of which 42 met inclusion criteria.

CONCLUSION. Strong evidence indicates that person-centered approaches can improve behavior. Moderate evidence supports noise regulation, environmental design, unobtrusive visual barriers, and environmental relocation strategies to reduce problematic behaviors. Evidence is insufficient for the effectiveness of mealtime ambient music, bright light, proprioceptive input, wander gardens, optical strategies, and sensory devices in improving behavior or reducing wandering and falls. Although evidence supports many environment-based interventions used by occupational therapy practitioners to address behavior, perception, and falls in people with AD and related major NCDs, more studies are needed.

 

Learning Objectives

Following this course, the learner will be able to: 

1)      Understand the incidence of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and the costs to society of AD and related major neurocognitive disorders (NCDs). Describe behaviors commonly seen in people with these conditions and impact on occupational participation.

2)      List various strategies and environmental modifications that are used to address behavior, perception and falls for individuals with AD and major NCDs.

3)      Explain the efficacy of environment-based interventions that address behavior, perception and falls in the home/other settings for individuals diagnosed with AD and related major NCDs and implications for occupational therapy practice. 

Exam questions for this course authored by Marie Morreale, OTR/L, CHT

Reference Information:

Jensen, L., & Padilla, R. (2017). Effectiveness of environment-based interventions that address behavior, perception, and falls in people with Alzheimer’s disease and related major neurocognitive disorders: A systematic review. American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 71, 7105180030. https://doi.org/10.5014/ajot.2017.027409

Learning Level: Advanced

Target Audience: Occupational Therapists and Occupational Therapy Assistants

Content Focus: Category 1: Domain of OT; Category 2: OT Process: Intervention

CE Find Key Words:  Falls, AD, Alzheimer’s disease, neurocognitive disorders