AJOT CE: Early Intervention in Mental Health for Adolescents and Young Adults: A Systematic Review
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SKU: CEAJOT69

Publisher: AOTA Continuing Education

Published: 2018

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Product Overview

Earn CE Credit With AJOT Articles!

Learn about tested treatment strategies by reading AJOT articles in your area of practice. Become an evidence-based practitioner and demonstrate your knowledge by passing the course exam.  Articles have been selected for their relevance to practice, fresh ideas, and strong evidence supporting treatment and the distinct value of OT.

Credit: .1 CEUs (1.25 NBCOT PDU’s/1 contact hour)

Authors

Halley Read, MOT, OTR/L, QMHP, is Clinical Assistant Professor, School of Occupational Therapy, Pacific University, Forest Grove, OR

Sean Roush, OTD, OTR/L, QMHP, is Associate Professor, School of Occupational Therapy, Pacific University, Forest Grove, OR.

Donna Downing, MS, OTR/L, is Family Psychoeducation Consultant, Maine Medical Center, Portland.

 

Abstract

OBJECTIVE. The purpose of this systematic review was to describe the evidence for the effectiveness of early intervention to improve and maintain performance in occupations for youths with or at risk for serious mental illness (SMI).

METHOD. Titles and abstracts of 670 articles were reviewed, 234 were retrieved for full review, and 30 met inclusion criteria.

RESULTS. Moderate to strong evidence supports cognitive remediation (CR) and mixed evidence supports cognitive–behavioral therapy (CBT) as an adjunct modality to improve general functioning. Moderate to strong evidence supports use of supported employment and supported education (SE/E) to improve social and occupational outcomes in employment and academics. Strong evidence supports family psychoeducation (FPE) to prevent relapse and rehospitalization and improve problem-solving skills and general functioning.

CONCLUSION. Occupational therapy practitioners should integrate CR, SE/E, and FPE into early intervention with youth with or at risk for SMI. In addition, CBT is an effective modality for use with this population.

Learning Objectives

Following this course, the learner will be able to:

1)      Discuss the impact of serious mental illness on occupational performance for adolescents and young adults. List benefits of early intervention services.

2)      Identify various early intervention strategies/modalities within the scope of occupational therapy to improve and maintain occupational performance for adolescents and young adults with or at risk for serious mental illness.

3)      Describe the evidence for effectiveness of early intervention to improve and maintain occupational performance for adolescents and young adults with or at risk for serious mental illness. Discuss implications for future research.

  

Exam questions for this course authored by Marie Morreale, OTR/L

Learning Level: Advanced

Target Audience: Occupational therapists and occupational therapy assistants

Content Focus: Category 1: Domain of OT; Category 2: OT Process: Intervention

CE Find Key Words:  mental health, serious mental illness, interventions, adolescents, at-risk youth, occupational performance, occupational participation.

Reference Information:

Read, H., Roush, S., & Downing, D. (2018). Early intervention in mental health for adolescents and young adults: A systematic review. American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 72, 7205190040. https://doi.org/10.5014/ajot.2018.033118