Occupational Performance Issues of Adults Seeking Bariatric Surgery for Obesity
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SKU: CEAJOT70

Publisher: AOTA Continuing Education

Published: 2018

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Product Overview

Earn CE Credit With AJOT Articles!

Learn about tested treatment strategies by reading AJOT articles in your area of practice. Become an evidence-based practitioner and demonstrate your knowledge by passing the course exam.  Articles have been selected for their relevance to practice, fresh ideas, and strong evidence supporting treatment and the distinct value of OT.

Credit: .1 CEUs (1.25 NBCOT PDU’s/1 contact hour)

Authors

Karen S. Barclay, MRSc, BSc(OT), Clinical Instructor, Department of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.

Susan J. Forwell, PhD(OS), Professor, Department of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia

Abstract

OBJECTIVE. We sought to describe the occupational performance issues of a sample of bariatric surgery candidates and to explore the relationships among occupational performance, satisfaction with performance, demographic characteristics, and mental health factors.

METHOD. We reviewed the health records of 241 bariatric surgery candidates and analyzed their scores on the Canadian Occupational Performance Measure (COPM) and standardized mental health questionnaires.

RESULTS. Exercise and eating behavior were the most common occupational performance issues. Cognitive and affective issues were reported more frequently than physical issues. Occupational performance and satisfaction correlated negatively with anxiety and depression and positively with self-esteem. Self-esteem contributed 27% of the variance in occupational performance.

CONCLUSION. COPM scores revealed a wide range of occupational performance issues and significant associations with mental health factors, supporting a psychosocial approach to occupational therapy with this population. Routine mental health screening can help ensure that mental health factors are adequately addressed.

 

Learning Objectives

Following this course, the learner will be able to: 

1)      Define obesity and understand the general criteria for bariatric surgery. List common physical and mental health issues associated with obesity.

2)      Discuss use of the Canadian Occupational Performance Measure with bariatric surgery candidates and identify common occupational performance issues that these individuals may have.

3)      Discuss the relationship of mental health factors on occupational performance for individuals who are candidates for bariatric surgery. Describe a psychosocial approach to occupational therapy with this population.

Exam questions for this course authored by Marie Morreale, OTR/L

 

Learning Level: Advanced

Target Audience: Occupational therapists and occupational therapy assistants 

Content Focus: Category 1: Domain of OT; Category 2: OT Process: Intervention 

CE Find Key Words:  mental health, obesity, self-esteem, COPM 

Reference Information:

Barclay, K. S., & Forwell, S. J. (2018). Occupational performance issues of adults seeking bariatric surgery for obesity. American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 72, 7205195030. https://doi.org/10.5014/ajot.2018.025924