AJOT CE: Predictive Value of the Cognitive Performance Test (CPT) for Staging Function and Fitness to Drive in People With Neurocognitive Disorders
AJOT CE: Predictive Value of the Cognitive Performance Test (CPT) for Staging Function and Fitness to Drive in People With Neurocognitive Disorders
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SKU: CEAJOT66

Publisher: AOTA Continuing Education

Published: 2018

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Product Overview

Earn CE Credit With AJOT Articles!

 

Learn about tested treatment strategies by reading AJOT articles in your area of practice. Become an evidence-based practitioner and demonstrate your knowledge by passing the course exam.  Articles have been selected for their relevance to practice, fresh ideas, and strong evidence supporting treatment and the distinct value of OT.

 

Credit: .1 CEUs (1.25 NBCOT PDU’s/1 contact hour)

 

Abstract

The Cognitive Performance Test (CPT) is a standardized occupational therapy assessment that examines cognitive integration with functioning in an instrumental activities of daily living context. Conventional cognitive measures provide diagnostic utility but do not fully address the functional implications. Ninety-one veterans diagnosed with cognitive impairment were evaluated. We compared the predictive value of the CPT with the Large Allen Cognitive Level Screen (LACLS), Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE), and Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA) for the need to retire from driving versus ability to pass an on-road exam. Measures were also analyzed by diagnostic classification. CPT correctly classified a mild versus major neurocognitive disorder, whereas MMSE, MoCA, and LACLS did not differentiate the groups. A CPT cutoff score of <4.7/5.6 showed 89% sensitivity for failing the road exam and 75% specificity for ability to pass. CPT discriminated functional level in neurocognitive disorders and had better predictive value for fitness to drive compared with conventional cognitive measures.

 

Authors

Theressa Burns, BS, OTR, is Clinical Occupational Therapist Specialist, Geriatric Research Education and Clinical Center, Minneapolis Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Minneapolis, MN.

 

Katie Lawler, MA, OTR/L, DRS, is Driving Rehabilitation Specialist, Geriatric Research Education and Clinical Center, Minneapolis Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Minneapolis, MN.

 

David Lawler, MA, OTR/L, CDRS, is Certified Driving Rehabilitation Specialist, Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Minneapolis Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Minneapolis, MN.

 

J. Riley McCarten, MD, is Co-Acting Director and Medical Director, Geriatric Research Education and Clinical Center, Minneapolis Veterans Affairs Medical Center, and Associate Professor, Department of Neurology, University of Minnesota Medical School, Minneapolis.

 

Michael Kuskowski, PhD, is Biostatistician, Geriatric Research Education and Clinical Center, Minneapolis Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Minneapolis, MN.

 

Exam questions for this course authored by Marie Morreale, OTR/L, CHT

  

Learning Objectives

 

1.        List functional cognitive deficits that adults with neurocognitive disorders may exhibit.

2.        Differentiate between mild and major neurocognitive disorder.     

3.        Describe at least 4 standardized cognitive assessments for adults including the Cognitive Performance 

       Test (CPT).

4.    Discuss the predictive value of the Cognitive Performance Test as a determinant for fitness to drive.

  

Learning Level: Intermediate

 

Target Audience: Occupational therapists and occupational therapy assistants

 

Content Focus: Category 1: Domain of OT; Category 2: OT Process: Evaluation

 

CE Find Key Words: Evaluation, Assessment, Driving, Neurocognitive disorders, Participation, Community

 

Reference Information:

Burns, T., Lawler, K., Lawler, D., McCarten, J. R., & Kuskowski, M. (2018). Predictive value of the Cognitive Performance Test (CPT) for staging function and fitness to drive in people with neurocognitive disorders. American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 72, 7204205040. https://doi.org/10.5014/ajot.2018.027052